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Canon EF Rewind Shaft Repair: How to Fix a Floppy Knob

Canon EF Rewind Shaft Repair: How to Fix a Floppy Knob

If the rewind knob and shaft on a Canon EF camera flops up and down, it’s likely because the shaft detent is missing. This is a common issue that can be easily fixed with a few simple tools and some basic knowledge of camera mechanics.

This article will guide you through the process of repairing the rewind shaft on your Canon EF camera. We’ll cover the following steps:

  • Identifying the problem
  • Disassembling the camera
  • Replacing the detent bearing and tension spring
  • Reassembling the camera

Identifying the Problem

The rewind shaft detent is a small, spring-loaded bearing that helps to hold the rewind knob in place. When this detent is missing or worn out, the knob will become loose and floppy. This can make it difficult to rewind film and can also damage the rewind mechanism.

To determine if the rewind shaft detent is the problem, try gently pushing the rewind knob up and down. If it moves freely, then the detent is likely missing or worn out. You can also inspect the rewind shaft for any signs of damage or wear.

Disassembling the Camera

Before you begin disassembling your camera, it’s important to make sure that you have the right tools and a clean workspace. You will need the following tools:

  • A small Phillips screwdriver
  • A small flathead screwdriver
  • A pair of tweezers

Once you have the necessary tools, you can begin disassembling your camera. Follow these steps:

  1. Remove the lens.
  2. Remove the camera’s top cover. This is usually held in place by a few screws around the perimeter of the cover. Be careful not to overtighten the screws when you reassemble the camera.
  3. Locate the rewind shaft. It is located on the right side of the camera body, near the film advance lever.
  4. Remove the rewind shaft. This may require removing a few small screws or clips that hold the shaft in place. Be careful not to lose any small parts.

Replacing the Detent Bearing and Tension Spring

Once the rewind shaft is removed, you can inspect the detent bearing and tension spring. If the detent bearing is missing or worn out, you will need to replace it. The tension spring may also need to be replaced if it is broken or damaged.

You can purchase replacement parts from a camera repair shop or online retailer. Be sure to purchase parts that are specifically designed for your Canon EF camera model.

To replace the detent bearing and tension spring, follow these steps:

  1. Remove the old detent bearing and tension spring. You may need to use a pair of tweezers to remove the bearing.
  2. Install the new detent bearing and tension spring. Make sure that the spring is properly seated in the bearing.

Reassembling the Camera

Once the detent bearing and tension spring have been replaced, you can reassemble your camera. Follow these steps in reverse order:

  1. Reinstall the rewind shaft.
  2. Reinstall the camera’s top cover.
  3. Reinstall the lens.

After you have reassembled your camera, test the rewind knob. It should now move smoothly and without any looseness. If the rewind knob is still floppy, you may need to repeat the repair process or seek professional help from a camera repair shop.

Troubleshooting Tips

  • If you are having trouble finding replacement parts, try contacting a camera repair shop or online retailer that specializes in Canon EF cameras.
  • If you are not comfortable disassembling your camera, it is best to seek professional help from a camera repair shop.
  • Be careful not to overtighten screws when reassembling your camera. Overtightening can damage the camera’s internal components.

Conclusion

Repairing the rewind shaft on a Canon EF camera is a relatively simple process that can be done with a few basic tools and some patience. By following the steps outlined in this article, you can fix a floppy rewind knob and restore your camera to its original functionality.

If you have any questions or need further assistance, please feel free to leave a comment below. Happy repairing!